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Four Questions You Should Ask About Google Trusted Stores

November 19, 2013 0 Comments

We are starting to get more questions regarding the Google Trusted Store. To help answer the questions that our retail customers have been asking we have put together this guide to tell you what you need to know.

What is a Google Trusted Store?

By definition, Google Trusted Store is an e-commerce certification. Think of it as a Better Business Bureau logo or PayPal Verified logo on your site. It should add to the credibility of your store because it’s not easy to get and Google is putting their name behind your store.

The benefit to the consumer is that Google will track statistics on your percentage of issue-free orders, percentage of on-time shipping, email response times to customers, average delivery days, your return policy and how long on average it take to process returns. To add an additional pack to Google’s punch, they offer consumer protection for up to $1,000 if the consumer does happen to run into issues with a Google Trusted Store partner.

Why Should I Care?

Sales. One of Digital Aptitude’s five core values is differentiation. Frankly, it’s the hardest of our five core values to maintain because it can be so hard to differentiate one online seller from another. Google Trusted Store gives you a great way to do that. When someone sees search results for a particular product, your store will be listed with the Trusted Store badge. You can see from the image below that the Trusted Stores really stand out:

Google 3Google will also have a popup window over the icon that shows your customer satisfaction stats. Here is a sample:

google image 2

Google claims in a number of case studies that conversion rates can increase from .1% to a hefty 9.6% and cart size averages increase between -.01% to 6.3% (Google Case Studies). If you had the same results (minus the -.01%) then it could make the program worth implementing.

Do I Qualify?

Google asks a lot from you to be a Google Trusted Store. Here are some of the most important qualification you need to know about:

  • You must process at least 200 submitted orders on a rolling 28-day basis.
  • The average time it takes for orders to be shipped must not exceed 10 days.
  • No more than 6% of all submitted orders may be cancelled.
  • Your store and checkout pages must be on the same domain.
  • You have to be able to add JavaScript code to your site pages and confirmation pages.
  • You must create daily feeds of shipment and cancelation details.
  • At least 50% of your shipments must have tracking numbers.
  • The products must be shipped to the customer and not to a retail store.
  • At least 90% or more of all shipments must be shipped by the estimated ship date.

Here is the full list of requirements. If you do qualify, then you are going to have to prove it. Google will use your provided data feeds as well as customer and merchant surveys to determine if you meet their criteria before you can use their badge on your site.

Should I Do It?

You should absolutely consider the possibility of doing it! In our opinion, there is an upside and a downside.

The upside is that you may see an increase in cart size and conversions. Google gives you a great tool with the Trusted Store badge.

There are three downsides as we see it. One, you have to have the “program badge” on EVERY page of the site. You are invested in this thing like a pig is invested in bacon. Two, you have to have some technical knowhow to setup all of the feeds. If you meet Google’s sales requirements then you most likely do, but it could be an issue for smaller online retailers. Three, you have to give Google direct access to tons of critical data. They require daily data feeds for anonymous shipping and cancellation data for all orders. This includes, but is not limited to estimated ship dates and order- and item-level details, in the JavaScript snippets on your store’s order confirmation page.

Bonus Link:

This is a very helpful article. It looks there are can be some technical issues when getting the trusted store set up. http://econsultancy.com/us/blog/63557-google-trusted-stores-the-good-the-bad-the-inevitable

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